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CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 4:30pm EST
kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i think, unfortunately, the situation in iraq has deter
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 11:00pm EST
of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think unfortunatel
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 9:00pm EST
in the united states and see what their efforts are. i want to begin with jeanne robinson, chief financial officer of first book. if you could describe what it is to start. >> yes, i just want to say thank you to c-span for all the support you've given tdi or industry and reading, literacy. c-span has been a leader on that and it's wonderful just to salute you. first book is a nonprofit and provides books and educational material to programs, serving cantonese, classroom serving kids in need across the united states. >> how to shoot it started and where the future funding from? >> we started 20 years ago. in fact, were celebrating her 100 millionth book distributed this week, probably when this airs, it will have been last week. we started 20 years ago at martha's table in washington d.c. we have distributed more and more as the years have gone by because we started a new remodel. in recent years redistributed 10 million, 11 million a year. we support programs across the united states is now over 40,000. our funding comes from corporate cause marketing campaigns we do as well as
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 7:00am EST
minister has nothing to hide, from the president of the united states. hopkins, whether true or not, some say it's not, hopkins behind out on that story for years. he was a gambler on horses and cars, even the time of day. married three times, between the second and third marriages, he dated glamorous womenhave movie stars like paulette goddard, actress dorothy hale, who actually she jumped from her apartment in new york to her death, allegedly because she had been jilted by harry hopkins. the former paris editor of the harper's bazaar, who he married actually on the second floor of the white house the summer of 1942. he regarded money, his own and other people's as something to be spent as quickly as possible. to put people into two categories. talkers and doers. and harry was definitely a do or. so the hopkins touch, the book, begins on may 10, 1940, and that was a year and half before the united states get into the second world war. it was a day when the germans overran the low countries and hitler's panzer division of tanks were masked in our dense forests, poised to invade luxe
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 8:00am EST
the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine and the united states' desire to push back. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid to get itself together to be able to, you know, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil. and the u.s. kind of took a, well, you know, you're really not as important as egypt, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it. and the result was that the prime minister at the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention. and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically the way that oil pricing was conducted by squeezing the independent oil companies -- occidental petroleum first and foremost -- into changing the system whereby there would be a 50/50 split and, basically, controlling interests by u.s. companies in libyan oil. and the consequence of that has come through to this day in terms of increasing the power of, the economic power of the gulf states, available b y
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 4:00pm EST
men in the pillbox. remarkably a lieutenant was educated in the united states and he said basically i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edlund said to him to the commander of the fort -- take me to the commander of the fort and that is what he did. with his tiny gun and a fabulous four when trudy locris battery, down an elevator, through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of this guns and -- guns of navarrone type situation and went to the commanding officer's office. edlund decided to break through the board. at that point of the commanding officer looked at him and said what do you want? he said we would like you to surrender the fort. the commanding officer was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the steel telephone. you are my prisoner. at that point robert edlund proudly had one of the greatest moves of world war ii. he pulled out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender the locris battery. 800 men from the locris battery surrendered after he broadcast that over the loudspeaker. incred
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 2:00pm EST
of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i think people are very
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 1:00pm EST
. during the time my parents were working in the united states, i would look at the mountain something about my parents being on the other side. >> host: where did you grow up originally? >> host: where did you grow up? >> guest: the little town in mexico that no one has heard of. but when they mention it, if you mention acapulco, people know where it is. it's about three hours away from their my father came here in 1977 and december my mother a few years later. my mother came here in 1980 when i was 4.5 years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states. >> guest: i came in 1985, in the month of may of 1985, i was nine and a half years old. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? >> guest: i have been separated from my father for about eight years. when he was sent to mexico in 1985, my family convinced him to come back here. to take us to the united states, we beg him to bring us here. we didn't want to spend any more time separated from him. i was nine under happen he thought it wouldn't be able to make across the border. because we had to
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:15pm EST
experience two cups of coffee basically, so this thing that's hard to get across people in the united states these policy makers is that coca isn't cocaine. indigenous people shouldn't be punished because some people refined into cocaine and abuse state and there's great value and this is an ancient tradition that doesn't harm people and the arrogance by which the foreign policy traced to dictate terms and countries like bolivia less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia and set in the united states. and the heavy-handed nature of the policy would think this is some kind of a flood from bolivia the way that we dictate terms in this country. now imagine if the united nations and the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way with the content they treat coca what would happen if they tell oblivion's chewing coca which they'd been doing for centuries if not thousands of years imagine if they did that to the united states you have to give up this habit now. she was a major that went to elmhurst college, and in 2001 he comes by europe with the administration to secretly them coffee for one d
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 1:30pm EST
that it would be taken from the united states that the united states entered the war. entered world war ii on behalf of the british. nothing is more important than making sure that there was no war. keeping britain out of the water and then the united states out of the war. and he did everything that he possibly could. he violated protocol, he did not file orders. he met secretly with german diplomats and he was convinced that as a businessman, he knew how to negotiate a deal. and that if he were put in a room with hitler, the two of them could negotiate and he refused to see that hitler was a madman. but he didn't care about the german people. but he had other fears that drove him. he told the leader of the zionist community, i'm going to go meet with them and work it out. he became so anti-churchill, antiwar effort, that the british spying on him, which i found in the national archives in britain. there are records of his conversation with german diplomats. he wanted to negotiate an end to the war. to negotiate a settlement that would prevent war and that would rescue the jewish r
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:30am EST
, we believed that the united states would eventually turn back the timing is threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by nazi germany. not, mind you, that we underestimate the might of the soviet military or the strength and resolve of the anti-anti-communist forces, the rate against us both at home and abroad. there were times we came close -- other conservative communists like james burnham wrote a book titled suicide of the west. we feared they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging education was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station a medium-range missiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar missiles on his side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world, with the biggest one scheduled for the hague, to which over 1 million people from every country in western europe were streaming pipeline, by bus, and on foot. the dutch broadcasters have erected a glass booth overlooking the square to which t
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 3:05am EST
around the world. the government of the united kingdom that spent a decade asking and promoting what it saw as nonviolent islamist extremist groups under the theory that only they could talk to the and dissuade violent extremists only to income in the end, the end of the blair period, that the shared world view was disastrous, and that, obviously, they should be backing antiextremists, individuals, and arguments. chambers' story, as has been said, is not the story of the loss of faith, but the acceptance of faith, christianity. in the current islamic case, the analogy is not perfect, but there is an analogy. after all, chambers was born into a faith and culture of christianity, in and around new york, in the first decade of the 20th century. he did not, in the end, adopt some foreign religion, but his own religion. that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamists convert to a foreign religion, but rather claim islam of their own ancestors, one unpoisenned by the extremism we associate with al-qaeda. the problem for us is that communism and christianity were v
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 4:00pm EST
young woman who had come to the united states who had come out first to see the second lady and then had come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact on her travels to important people. she treated everyone she met as though they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sensed her sincerity and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her role when she could take action. the party the nixons were at and the engagement they were going to were not as important at that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. in the greater scheme of things, this is really a small act. but it left a lasting impression both on the woman involved, the indian woman involved, and on the women at the table that she was eventually seated at. that's how we actually know about the event, is through a letter that someone who she ended up sitting with responded and wrote to pat later about it. for pat politics was her job and one she didn't always enjoy. while on occasion she was proud of her work in helping to raise funds for
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 10:15am EST
wrong, you don't have to have a pedigree to be a dog. a word is still nothing more than a unit of communication. but the -- so i really started looking into this. did a lot of, you know, research, a lot of looking into the presidents. and the storyline in this, it's an a to z book, so you can go and dip in as you see fit. some of the stuff is funny, some not so funny. but really what the nexus of the whole thing is if you look back at the beginnings of this country and the whole concept of language and of what this country was, there's a letter that's written between benjamin franklin and noah webster, the dictionary maker, in which they talk about acts of resistance, acts of rebellion, acts of response to the british. and they're talking, they use various words to talk about it, but they're really sort of american acts to sort of identify who we are as a people. and what are involved in these acts? one of the acts is public libraries. benjamin franklin has come to this country, his father's come to this country smuggling a bible, smuggling a bible into the seat of a chair and tel
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 5:15pm EST
the mission of the second airborne are 101st or even the marine corps. 19,000 troops, two units had prepared, had been given advance notice and were prepared. why all this for one african american student who wants to get an education, that -- is because the whole state was in an insurrection from the governors, the state house itself down to the 11-year-old who was starring bricks in the street. it was total chaos, total mayhem . even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away, so there was year insurrection. the -- it lasted two or three days, the violent part, and after that i was appointed to be a security officer for james meredith and went to school with him. he went to school. i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, three jeeps, 12 soldiers and we were there throughout the year. we transfer back and forth. almost one year until he graduated in august of 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all white neighborhood in south minneapolis. that was pretty much it. and so it was an eye-opening for me, but, again, we were trained, and i'm so proud of what the army did. w
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 7:00am EST
depend more on the banking system than they do here in the united states. why? because with a more developed capital market. and so that it was developed capital market, so although it is starting to develop more rapidly. and so the key as i said to getting them back to growth is the banking system. and so all the things i've mentioned here are very important. european central bank has put in the ltros, three-year loans at 1%. they did that a year ago. and now they've done the omb. they've lessened the amount of collateral necessary to par with european central banks. and the banking system there has been shedding assets because they had to raise additional capital. and they've income stream more on that been thinking, unfortunately, and a lot of you in this room are aware of that. and some of the benefactors of that, beneficiaries are japanese banks have been buying portfolios and investors like will up on the market. but we've got to get the european banks back up to lending. that is key to all of what i have said here. then i would just say a few words about, and again, firm tim
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 11:00am EST
on the militants there, as well as the united states drone strikes in the area, not as much attention has been paid to the actual people who live there, in their point of view. in our public opinion survey, while not starving and some of its conclusions, i think it's an insight into where future policy might head. here's some of the key findings, and their set forth in the book in detail. nearly nine out of every 10 residents in the fatah region opposed u.s. military operation. this is not a few that slightly held. in fact, passionately and intensely help but here's one measure of why. when only one in 10 people, flat top, flat top, one and 10 full-time residents, in tribal areas think that suicide attacks are ever justified against pakistani military forces, almost six in 10 believe these attacks are justified against the united states military. much of the antipathy towards the united states stems from one cause and one cause really only. and that against cia director jon strikes on militants living in the area. more than three quarters of fatah residents oppose these stri
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 9:00am EST
>> it's about 50 minutes. >> okay, good morning, everybody. my name is maria, and i am the united states register of copyrights and the director of the u.s. copyright office, and i'd like to say at the outstart that for me this is a very wonderful privilege because, as you may or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress, this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright built. and with that, let me start by just introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. their bios in depth, of course, are in the program and online. but to my immediate left is tom allen who is a former congressman from maine and is presently the president and the chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left is james shapiro who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and author and vice president of the authors' guild. he's a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york, jim. and did you also come down from new york? >> this week i was here. >> this week you were
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 12:00pm EST
units had prepared, had been given advance notice as to what they were doing and they prepared for it in riot control. why all of this for one african-american student who wanted to get an education? it's a brand name university. it's because the whole state was an insurrection from the government to to the statehouse itself statehouse itself down to the 11-year-old who were throwing bricks at us in the streets. it was total chaos, a little mayhem and even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away so there was your insurrection. it lasted two or three days. the violent part of it and then after that i was appointed to be the security officer for james meredith and went to school with him, or he went to school and i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, 12 soldiers and we were there throughout the year. we transferred back and forth in the army was in place for almost a year until he graduated in august of 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all all-white neighborhood in south minneapolis. johnson, swanson, peterson and bergstrom and a few italians but that was pretty mu
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:00pm EST
because the price of housing exceeds their income. they're in the top 10% of income in the united states. that means housing is no longer accessible to the middle class. and when the middle class can't buy housing, the middle class as we have known it since 1950 ceases to exist. so that's part two of the book. i've got programs that don't work, programs that do work. and then the intellectual challenge which really took the longest period to get my head around was, okay, if you know that these programs don't work and you've got a good fix on why and you know these programs do work and you have a good fix on why, are you capable of developing a social program or a blueprint for a program that would work? and that turned out to be quite tricky. you would like to help children. you would like to deal with social disadvantage of children. and the road block turns out that it is simply not in the political cards whether you're on the left or center, right of center or right on the center. our government is not about to help children by directing significant social resources to their pa
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 7:00am EST
, are united on this attitude to provide finance for publishing of books by copyright, or for having your own -- >> we certainly have an insight for the people that produce literature, people that produce history. but we are not in the business of making law. we also have an instinct for wanting to have access. so there's a distinction between, for example, supporting the concept of copyrights and whether they should last 85 years or longer. and what kind of access to digital capacities exist for books that are not being sold. these are really serious questions. because suddenly we have locked up in every library in america books that are not being sold that a lot of people would like to have access to, if it was free. and that's for digitization basically provides. and so to some degree people are going to have to come to grips with it. there's a secondary issue, by the way, in terms of the visual arts, where artists, families for extended periods of times have copyright in effect, powe powers, over great works of art. and how long that should last is a really powerful question. i w
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 6:45am EST
have the army unit on the eastside. reinforced regiment. you have the first marine division reinforced by 15,000 marines. so it's a laboratory example comparing decisions made by generals but in this case, not all cases, by the one, -- [inaudible]. not all cases to be deemed to do better than the army. in this case they did, clearly the o. p. smith makes a series of very smart decisions even though he has all meant and macarthur really pushing them in the wrong direction in the kind of reckless fashion. the army unit on the side of chosin reservoir, people forget this, got wiped out. 90% casualty rate. they would only survive because they're able to stagger out on the ice of the reservoir and walked down to the marine lodge four miles to the south. and because a little-known marine colonel went out with some corpsmen and submarines over the course of several days and pulled in a lot of wounded he found wandering, staggering around modestly on the eyes. while turning focus -- i kind of like this marine colonel. i'm blanking out in his name because one point he he was a relief pitcher in
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 11:15pm EST
deserve a second term as president of the united states? has opponents say no to all of the above and that they consider socialistic tenant is an putting the desire to copy your pm foundations for the stimulus -- i'm sorry, skip to page here. to desire the european government economic policy as the basis for the campaign to deny him the office. his liberal democratic party complains that he compromise successively in the tea party controlled congress and expansion of the debt level and other legislation. they expressed concern he did not appear to be a decisive leader of such legislation or in the management of the health care proposal. some of the supporters believe congress is given a free range in the design of health care plans, it accused of destroying bipartisanship by independents who also were disturbed by what they see as inability to meet and negotiate with republican opposition. there could be no question that obama? experience in government, either as governor for a long term member of congress on any face of business. further, his background and academics ms community wor
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 11:15am EST
temperament to deserve a second term as president of the united states? his opponents say no to all of the above, and to ask that -- have socialistic tendencies, including his desire to copy european -- from -- i'm sorry. skipped a page. to desire a copy european government economic policies as a basis for the campaign to deny him the office. his liberal democratic party complained that he compromise obsessively and the tea party controlled congress and expanding the debt level and other legislation. they express concern he did not appear to be a decisive leader, with such legislation or in the management of the health care proposal. some of his supporters believe congress was given a free rein in the design of health care plans. is accused of destroying bipartisanship, by independents who also are disturbed by what they see as his inability to meet and negotiate with republican opposition. there could be no question that obama like six parents in government, either as governor or as a long-term member of congress, or in any phase of the business world. further his background in aca
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:00pm EST
think urged to a invested in are not abroad so repatriating money that his tax back to the united states allowing us to create jobs here and maybe could be tied into creating an infrastructure bank or something like that the point is we need fundamental changes. believe it or not we care more than anything else about the health of the u.s. economy because that determines our future. we support the simpson -- it hurts everyone and it's painfully been for us but we need the stability and our finances as a country and every responsible business should stand up and say that. both sides republicans and democrats are recognizing the pain has to be spread around so those are big issues for us and their things that affect innovation. basically people don't produce anything but lawyers is not a good way to get a society and from the smallest to start up to the biggest company we need more certainty. and ginobli are violating patents and we shouldn't be putting people out of work and actively run companies if they don't even think there are breaking someone's patent. >> host: do a lot of me
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 12:30am EST
challenging these restrictions. they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states though because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon wended the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> guest: cases from the federal territories had come in the 19th century by especially utah of polygamy but from the states, the really major cases made it to the supreme court in the late 1930's and early 1940s, really that new deal era. they tended not so much to be the salvation army that the jehovah's witnesses who also cause a lot of trouble. >> host: what was one of those cases? walk us through. >> guest: well, very interesting case called cantwell against connecticut involved a group of witnesses who had gone into the catholic neighborhood in new haven on a sunday morning and began playing anti-catholic records on portable phonographs and distributing literature. they were arrested for disturbing the peace and preaching without a permit, and appeal their case all the way to the supreme court. which said that because connecticut said well
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 1:00pm EST
review organization in which physicians get together. look, if you're the president of the united states, you've got no business down the steep in the weeds. jimmy carter got way into the wee, so he is writing we meet these minor interventions by physicians. and that was his problem. he got so into the weeds that he forgot the president job is to tell the big picture. it's easy to see jimmy carter's real problem was he was not good at articulating the big picture. what you don't see until you get into the archives and i think when people read her book, they will get a sense of this. the president as an individual, his personality is really driving this kind of detailed look. so that is an aspect of the presidency in health care. the individual really just think spyware. >> here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals happening around the country. >> charles kupfer come to associate american studies professor at harrisburg. the author of a new book, "indomitable will: turning defeat into victory from pearl harbor to midway" focusing on the first half of world war ii, what is
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 4:10am EST
shared with chambers, inseparable from a commensurately powerful love for and faith in the united states of america and the civilization for which it had gone to war against the two great carriers of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging occasion was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between it
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 7:00am EST
that waged by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war which was not about war by any means, from being really enthusiastic and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning against the war. and i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happened in 1847 is a consensus really across the board, people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all thi
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 8:00am EST
. mr. evans is one of the leading members of the conservative movement in the united states. his book blacklisted by history:the untold story of senator joe mccarthy and his fight against america's enemies gives an account of the age of mccarthyism during the cold war. evans has been the recipients of honorary documents from syracuse university and the john marshall law school and accuracy in media award for excellence in journalism. please join me now in welcoming our panelists. [applause] >> would you like to start? >> such a pleasure and honor to be here once again. i was flattered to be asked to participate in the first seminar last year and i didn't do too badly because i am back today. and icy some good friends out here and also some people including senator jim buckley and he deserves a round of applause. [applause] >> let us begin with a paradox. whitaker chambers was a soviet spy who became in bill buckley's words the most important american defector from communism. chambers's public witness about the seductive attractions of communism and its treasonous adherents began in au
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 12:00pm EST
she learned arabic to comfort the parte. they have the only io al sis unit in the country for awhile, and they drove a shuttle, picked the people up for free, brought them in, and they were treated. the whole atmosphere was to make everyone not only comfortable, but able to observe their religious obligations, so the ultra orthodox were making sure there was rom dan food served at a time, but it was the effort they went through, and the effort she went to and her concern she could sit and talk to people and comfort and encourage them that they were perfectly safe. that is really typical, and, in fact, there's many stories of people that have come in for treatment and have had their mind changed by the way they were treatedded in israeli hospitals, not just medically treated, but treated as human beings with the same curtesy that any jew or nip else would have. those stories abound. even i went to visit -- there's a man who is a ugandan pastor, a convert from islam to christianity. he came quite an outspoken evangelist for christianity after his conversion, and he had a church of a th
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30pm EST
there was ever a more wicked war than that waged on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war tha
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 5:30pm EST
berry shares her stories about serving on the united states commission on civil rights. set ultimate by president eisenhower in 1957. this is about a half an hour. >>> on your screen now on booktv is a well known face for c-span viewers. that's mary francis berry. professor at the university of pennsylvania. she's also the author of several books. at the university of pennsylvania today to talk to her about this book. "and justice for all." "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" mary francis berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission begin and why? >> well, it started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with secretary of state about the way the united states was seen around the world because a lot of the racism that was going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening whether it was lynching or some kind of discrimination that took place in the country. so the idea was eisenhower -- said he was going to a
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 7:00pm EST
bankrupt. in the united states, added that fewer than 1 million farms, there are 115,000 very large farms. many of these use contract labor. you might ask how did we end up with a subsidy system and who really benefits from it and who is lobbying for a? so now we are going to look at some things that you are now. the government created programs to deal with overproduction and create prosperity for farmers because family farmers really suffering in those days. and in part from overproduction. overproducing crops has always been the bane of the farmer's existence. because it drives prices down. and the companies really like those prices to be driven down. so these were supply management programs because the problem is that individual farmers always want to plant as much as they possibly can so that they can make as much money from their equipment and land and, you know, today it even cost to cover the cost of production. so if every farmer is growing everything that they can come and that means that we are going to have a lot more commodity crops than we really need. in the 1930s, to
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 4:00pm EST
the great uniter. remember the beautiful inaugural address is glorious where he said to conservatives, i want to listen to you, especially when we disagree. nice coming beautiful idea. he was going to meet with conservatives in congress once a week. i was a great idea. he met twice. so three days after the speech, conservatives in congress came and had a meeting and eric cantor reticulated conservative to run increasing taxes. that we shouldn't do that. you know what obama said three days after? he said eric, i want, you must come i trump you on that. a week later he said i want the folks who got us into this mess to do a whole lot less talking and a lot more listening. you can talk a little, but he wants you to stand beside mine so we cleaned this up for you. unbelievable, condescending notion of unifying the country, bringing us together. instead kansas city mantra of attack and vilify the other side. it was just like his 2008 campaign for president was hoping change, while the speeches with no substance whatsoever. the only substance as he was going to unify us come to be that post
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 8:30pm EST
briefly about the last five years. the united states as we know is the largest producer of books in the world and over the course of the last decade we have seen that production verging. when i began editing books at "the washington post" in the '90s american publishers were producing 50,000 books a year. 10 years later still in the same position in 2003, they were producing 330,000 books annually. look world at the time, we were getting 150 books a day, 40,000 books a year and of that 40,000, only 1600 could be reviewed. in 2007, that number climbs to 415,000 books a year published by american publishing. in 2009, a mere two years later, 1,100,000 books are published in the usa according to bowker. two-thirds of them, or 725,000 of them, were self-published. so you see the whole idea of self-publishing, social media, the facebook culture, brought about a huge wave of self-publishing. in 2011, just last year they reported 3 million books published in this country. i suspect only 15 or 20% of those are published by mainstream university or were small presses. this means that readers are
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
city leaders together with designers for intensive planning sessions. every two months in the united states and other eight and designers, lock ourselves in a room for two days and try to salvage mayors mispricing design challenge. as imagined working side-by-side with a couple hundred mayors, one may at a time could be greater design education in anything it done before or since. they specialize in downtown someone higher to make a downtown plan elected and if there with my family, preferably for a month. there's many reasons to pursue a city where you plan it. first it's more efficient in terms of travel and meetings, something that can become expensive. second to get to know a place to memorize every building, street and block. it gives you the chance to get familiar with locals over coffee, dinner some people's homes, drinks the neighborhood's pads and chance encounters on the street. these non-meeting meeting for most of the real intelligence could collect it. these are all great reasons, but the main reason to spend time in the city is the place for the citizen. shuttling betwe
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 7:00pm EST
afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyway we are pleased to have this occasion and have a discussion about the subjects that are in the book
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 3:00pm EST
largest, um, food company in the united states, if you want to call those items food. and it's the second largest in the world. or they might buy a nestle product. they had 94 billion in sales and 10.5 billion in profits. pepsi had about 6.4 billion in profits. that's because nestle, it's the biggest food company in the world. they're not just in the u.s. so, you know, basically in every subsector of the food industry we have just a few companies that are controlling all of those brands. twenty companies control the highest percentage of brands in the grocery store. and of those 14 of those brands control organic food. so big food is basically controlling what people eat. then we have the grocery conglomerates. walmart leads the pack along with kroger, costco and target. those are the four large. but walmart is by far the largest. one out of every three grocery dollars goes to walmart. the walmart heirs have more or wealth than the bottom 40% of all americans. if we wonder why they have a lot of of clout and political power. so these really big multi-nationals use this political an
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 3:00pm EST
beneath you. you're out of water. you hope the rest of your unit know it's you on the roof. someone is shooting. watch the tracers, keep low. you may be there all night. you may be there for the rest of your life. you watch the windows for nip you don't know. you don't know anyone. thanks to the rules of engagement, pilot identification is reasonable certainty. you're in urban sprawl and your friends' vehicle is ahead, tires burning, the marines are throwing sand on the wreckage. the tires cannot be smothered. you can smell the smoke, and all the while it isn't your house you have invaded. the family in the room beneath you is waiting for you to leave. someone is still shooting. you are not sure, and the shimmering imagination of night vision equipment, if you can see something moving. that can't be positively identified. you hold your fire. you hold your position. that can be precision, -- that can be your profession. you don't want to let anyone down. >> have gone out into other peoples lives. we gathered our wreckage and dead some someone who lived there filling the holes in the roa
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 6:30am EST
because it was an interest on the part of the united states government to have information flowing freely and have things picked up from one newspaper to another during the debate over ratifying the constitution in fact, massachusetts is probably known very resistant to the new constitution, the supporters of it in massachusetts happen to control the mail. one of the most influential document was the opposition of the pennsylvania minority to pennsylvania's ratification. this circulated throughout the country except in massachusetts. the post office here held it up because they didn't want this to be entering into political discourse before massachusetts had voted. so controlling the post office and controlling the flow of news is one of the essential things here that this book really helps us to see the connections between the connection between the free flow of information which is something different than the free flow of information today. >> i think that you're right, besides the printers are really weren't other people employed at these newspapers. there might be gentlemen li
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 3:00pm EST
environmental conditions in their different regions of the united states. these markets a understand these businesses are going to face real challenges when our climate changes those prevailing conditions. whether it's liar sea levels, stronger storms, warmer winters, or drier summers, no state and no economy will be unaffected by climate change. we're already seeing real-life examples of the economic consequences of a rapidly changing environment. the economic research service of the u.s. department of agriculture reported that 80% of american agricultural land is experiencing drought, making this the most expensive drought since the 1950's. more than half a century ago. last month deutsche bank securities estimated that the drought will reduce 2012 economic growth in the u.s. by .5% to 1%. shipping on the mississippi river has been reduced and may stop in areas where drought has left water levels too low for safe passage. the american waterways operators and the waterways council estimate that $7 billion worth of commodities are supposed to ship on the mississippi in december and january
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 10:00am EST
taliban itself at a time when the united states was really puzzling over its resurgence as a movement, as a political force in afghanistan, as a military challenge, and really a challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 defeat of the islamic emirates of afghanistan in which revived and presented itself as a really grave dilemma to the obama administration as it arrived in 2009. and so our effort was to do what think tanks do which is just to try to provide some ground truth and some complexity and granularity about this phenomenon, recognizing that the sort of clicheed iml imagine of a one-eyed mullah and his band of devoted and intractable fanatics was inadequate and really a falsifying of the problem. so the purpose was not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban, but just to start to document some sections of its diversity and some aspects of its character that were otherwise, um, not part of american debate or discourse. so i'm really, really proud of this book and of peter particularly whose leadership of the national security studies program at
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 7:00pm EST
free through the mails because it was an interest in the part of the united states government to have information flowing freely so you things picked up. there during the debate over ratifying the constitution. in fact, massachusetts was very resisted to the new constitution the supporters in massachusetts have been to control the mails in one of the most influential document as the opposition of the minority to the pennsylvania ratification and the circulated come except in massachusetts. the post office hold it up because they didn't want this entering into the political discourse before massachusetts had voted. controlling the post office and the flow of news is one of the essential things here in this book really helps us see the connections between this, the connection between the free-flowing information, which is somewhat different from the free flow of information today. >> i think figure writing the observation that besides the printers, there weren't other people employed at these newspapers. there might be gentlemen at the adams cousins coming once or twice a week to make s
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:15am EST
united states government and one. [laughter] that's just how important -- impossible it seemed when it all began. >> mr. standiford, of the american colonies, who in your opinion was most radical in terms of methods? >> who was most radical? well, certainly in his passion, in its desperate passion and in his ability to convey it and his ability to rally troops, or supporters, it was a sam adams. i believe that if it had not been for sam adams, would we have -- people always are fond of asking this question. did the sons of liberty really bring us, create a revolution? my answer is yes. history shows it. would there have been a revolution had these men not done what they did as they did at the time they did? maybe. when, we don't know. it would have been the leaders of the battles, we can't be sure. and how -- some say we could have ended up like canada. yes, we would have probably broken away from great britain, but in the way that canada did. there's speculation along those lines. the other interesting thing that's at debate in this book is in academia i think mr. nasaw would concu
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
the unit enormous look like. they are describing the soldiers that have -- another interesting advertisement in that struck know in the january 20th, 17 1776th. we have thomas paine's common sense one of the first advertisement for common sense. there it is. what is interesting to me about the in the same newspaper is another advertisement for a new edition of common sense which suggests how quickly this is moving. which brings note history discovery. no taxation without representation. that argument springs to life newspaper. the 1764 issue of the pennsylvania gazette. on page two is one paragraph that details the forthcoming sugar act. in that article, it says a scheme of taxation, had had been previously debated in the parliament will weather they had a power to lay it on which had no representative on parliament. you get the teaser. besides this an internal tax was cut off and can't see that. besides this the internal tax is forthcoming. a stamp duty. violence and mobs and rites are also something that struck me because of the sheer magnitude of the violence that is reporte
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 6:30pm EST
status, are you french-canadian origin? now, i'm david cameron, prime minister of the united kingdom. president romney looked at kamran and ben harper and cameron again. brothers he said? cousins? uncle and aunts. no cameron said. at that point the group boys joined by yoshiko nardo of japan. he and president romney were introduced. what are you run 55 or 60 the president announced? in a close? and 56 years of age the japanese prime minister said rather formally. yoshiko sans french-canadian. [laughter] i don't suppose you're french-canadian origin? no, i am not the prime minister said. congratulations to president replied. [laughter] sought roca bennett the detroit tigers hit a grand slam home run in 1850 and it wasn't until 2008 at another jewish pitcher hit a grand slam home run. congratulations chancellor merker said. [laughter] guess the other murmured, congratulations. thank you. [applause] >> hi, i just want to remind everyone with mics at the front or question-and-answer period form a line going up the auditorium. roughly 25 minutes for questions. thank you. >> hello.
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 9:00am EST
flying back to the united states after a quick and totally self-indull gent weekend in london. -- indulgent weekend in london. it's midday. you look out the window of the plane at the atlantic ocean below you, and what do you see? waves. if you want, you can lock your eyes on just one wave and follow it for minutes. it has a distinct identity. it trails off to the north as far as your eye can see, and its hump seems as well formed as the back of a whale. remember when you were a kid and rolled a ball of clay out on a tabletop until it made a long, round clay rope? that's what the wave looks like. but the wave has a peculiar property, very peculiar. it doesn't exist. what? of course the wave exists. if you were in a lazily-moving blimp, you could follow it for a thousand miles. you could follow it for days until it broke off the shores of maine. if you were in the water on a surfboard, you could ride its hump, and if you carefully picked your way over the slippery rocks of a jetty off the maine coast and you tripped or slipped while a breaker was smashing its fist against the g
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 6:00pm EST
enemies within what was supposed to be the united front against lincoln and the union but he was a darn good commander in chief at the beginning. she chose brilliant people. a lot of them were killed early in the war. maybe it was a mistake leaving him in the western virginia for too long. on the other hand, lincoln was always a brilliant politician and he defined the war brilliantly in the unprecedented situation but he warned to be the commander-in-chief on the job. >> it's a tough choice. >> both of them are on the job training and their resume. is that there are some different places and that's what i think happens to be there is a question out here if we can get a focus question we appreciate that. >> reading the book one of the things i found in the period before the inauguration lincoln was holding his cards close in this impending civil war fdr did the same crisis in the economy before he was inaugurated and nobody knew what he was going to do and people said that they should have sent signals. it would have helped the country but it seems like it helped them do a better job wai
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 6:00pm EST
united states you have no business down this deep in the weeds. jimmy carter got way into the weeds, so he's actually writing these minor interventions by physicians. and that was his problem. he got so into the weeds that he forgot the president's job is to tell the picture. jimmy carter's chief of real problem is he wasn't very good at articulating the big picture. which we don't see until we get into the archives. and i think when people read our book, they will get a sense of this. the president as an individual, his own personality was driving this kind of detailed look. so that's an aspect of the presidency and of health care. we don't think about it and get this guy, the individual really drives things forward. >> for more information on booktv's visit to providence rhode island and other cities visited by local content of vehicles, go to c-span.org/localcontent. ..
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